Get in touch

Speak to us now on live chat

Speak to someone on the phone

We can call you

Send us an email

Go Back

Call us today:

020 8115 4286

If you wanted to speak to a local expert, please go here to contact a specific branch.

Please provide us with the below details and one of our local experts will be in contact.

Please provide us with the below details and one of our local experts will be in contact.

All done

Thank you for providing us with your contact details, one of our local experts will be in contact.

Get in touch
  • Speak to us now on live chat
  • Speak to someone on the phone
  • We can call you
  • Send us an email
Go Back

Please provide us with the below details and one of our local experts will be in contact.

Go Back

Please provide us with the below details and one of our local experts will be in contact.

Go Back

Call us today:

020 8115 4286

If you wanted to speak to a local expert, please go here to contact a specific branch.

Go Back

All done

Thank you for providing us with your contact details, one of our local experts will be in contact.

Contact The kinetic art movement

Fill in the form below to get in touch

Sales or Lettings enquiry

Your Details

We will use your data for the purpose of your enquiry. After we have responded, we would also like to send you emails with information on our other products and services, including our regular newsletter which contains special offers, property photos, hot topics and useful tips.
Please tick this box if you are happy to receive this and remember you can change your preferences at any time. If you would like to know more about how we use your data please visit our Privacy Notice here

All done

We received your message. Our expert local team will review your details and get back to you shortly.

If you need any more information call us on

Contact Brentford area

Fill in the form below to get in touch

Your Details

We will use your data for the purpose of your enquiry. After we have responded, we would also like to send you emails with information on our other products and services, including our regular newsletter which contains special offers, property photos, hot topics and useful tips.
Please tick this box if you are happy to receive this and remember you can change your preferences at any time. If you would like to know more about how we use your data please visit our Privacy Notice here

All done

We received your message. Our expert local team will review your details and get back to you shortly.

If you need any more information call us on

Property Search Request Valuation
Search
Call us 02080225147

The kinetic art movement

Our interior design partners J&D Design explore the kinetic art movement and discuss how to bring it into your home. 

The adjective kinetic has its roots in the Greek word kinesis, meaning “motion”.  So what is kinetic art?  The simplest definition is “art that depends on motion for its effect”.

Kinetic art is a form of modern art which developed during the during the Impressionist movement, continued through the Dada and Constructivist era of the 1910s, and came into its own after the Second World War with a genre-defining group exhibition- ‘Le Mouvement’- held in Paris in 1955.

Many kinetic artists were interested in analogies between machines and human bodies. This idea has deep roots in the Dada movement, however it is also related to the mid-century concept of cybernetics.  The Swiss artist Jean Tinguely, one of the mid-century pioneers of kinetic art, declared “The only stable thing is movement.”  His sculptural machines expressed his view that all that mattered was “To live in the present.”

Kinetic art in lighting

Electrum Kinetic Chandelier, £1,095.00, Jonathan Adler; Applique Lederam Wall Light, £409.00, Made in Design; Right Light Advanced Touch Wall Lights, from £89.99 (for 3 pieces), Decoramo; OPTI Aura Sensory Projector, £173.95, Glow; Spring Pendant, from £650.00, Tom Dixon; Heng Balance Lamp, from £29.99 Amazon

Kineticism was introduced across several artistic media, including painting, drawing and sculpture, and many kinetic artists sought to work with ever newer and more public media in order to bring the style to a wide audience.  Artists associated with a broadly Constructivist approach to Kinetic art include Naum Gabo, László Moholy-Nagy, Victor Vasarely, and Bridget Riley, many of whom borrowed concepts from fields such as physics, optics, and cybernetics.

Naum Gabo’s Kinetic Construction (1920), arguably the prototype for all subsequent kinetic art, was designed to express the concept of the “standing wave” – a type of wave-motion creating the illusion of a static, curvilinear form – while the Op Art pioneer Victor Vasarely based his visual tricks on studies of the ocular perception of line and colour.  New conceptions of the relationship between time and space were established by the work of theoretical physicists such as Albert Einstein and provided a cultural context for the fascination with movement evident in kinetic art.

kinetic art

Kinetic mobile, £155.00, Etsy; Spotlight 3 Sculpture by Valerie Lallican, £1,223.00, Saatchi Art; Mini Cradle Balance Balls, £6.59 Amazon; Kinetic Wall Sculpture, Sea Dream £1,015.58 (Classic edition this piece is number 3 of 79), Etsy; Astrid Luglio – Partenope Kinetic Sculpture £1,795.00 Artemest

The interaction of science and kinetic art was arguably most strikingly expressed by Nicholas Schöffer’s “Spatiodynamic” sculptures of the 1940s-50s, intelligent machines whose movements and physical activities altered according to changes in their external environment. These works were influenced by the then newly established field of cybernetics, which posed a series of analogies between human and artificial intelligence.

By the mid-1960s kinetic artists and their work were increasingly recognised; Julio Le Parc, a pioneer in interactive kinetic art, was awarded the Grand Prize for Painting at the Venice Biennale in 1966 and Nicolas Schöffer won the prize for sculpture in 1968; the Galerie Denise René celebrated ten years of kinetic art in 1965 with a group show entitled Le Mouvement 2.

Kinetic art is still prevalent today, and styles include mobiles and mechanical sculptures as well as 2D Op-art paintings, which create optical illusions appearing to rotate or vibrate in front of the eyes.  As with many aesthetic tendencies, kinetics manifested as a creative culture long before it appeared in fine art. Probably the earliest example of artistic kinetics is the wind chime, which was in use at least 5000 years ago throughout Southeast Asia, exemplifying exploration of the sacred and the interconnectedness of humans and nature.

kinetic art in the garden

Alienus Crystal Wind Chime, £35.99, Wayfair; Hourdial Sundial by Alastair Hunter £495.00, Art Parks; Shattered Lens by Jane Bohane £700.00, Art Parks; Art Nouveau Weather Vane by Paul Margetts, from £300.00, Forging Ahead

A vast range of individual artists have employed movement in their work in one way or another since the 1960s, some of them influenced by kinetic art and almost all of them by the same principles that informed the movement.

In this blog we highlight examples of contemporary artists with work in different genres of kinetic art. Examples include Spotlight 3 Sculpture by Valerie Lallican, Shattered Lens by Jane Bohane and the Electrum Kinetic chandelier by Jonathan Adler.

J&D Design specialise in the application of colour and design, and provide clients with personalised design services, including interior design, commissioning artworks, lighting schemes and garden landscaping. In addition to their range of personalised design services, J&D Design offers a remote E-Design service and gift vouchers, with exclusive discounts for Marsh & Parsons’ clients. Find out more here.

If you’d like to read more from J&D design, they’ve written plenty more for the Marsh & Parsons blog, from eco-friendly design tips to lighting trends for 2020. 

Eight spectacular properties to watch out for this autumn Read More
South London sees high levels of tenant demand Read More
An exceptionally busy lettings market throughout London Read More
What should cohabiting couples consider before buying a property? Read More
Hammersmith Bridge reopens to pedestrians Read More
What are the changes to the Right to Rent legislation? Read More
What does the lettings market for family homes look like in central London? Read More
Exceptional demand for family homes in south London Read More
London sales market set for one of the busiest summers on record Read More
Nine of the most luxurious homes on the market Read More

Marsh & Parsons is registered in England (Company No. 05377981) Registered office address: 80 Hammersmith Road, London, W14 8UD (VAT No. GB 842 7959 83) | Copyright © Marsh & Parsons 2018

Client Money Protection is provided by Propertymark. The redress scheme for Marsh & Parsons is The Property Ombudsman Scheme. Calls may be recorded and/or monitored for training and/or data protection purposes. We are members of The Property Ombudsman (TPO), there to protect your interests. We abide by the TPO code of conduct.

We may refer you to recommended providers of ancillary services such as Financial Services and Insurance. We may receive a referral fee for recommending their services. You are not under any obligation to use the services of the recommended provider, which may also be an associated company of Marsh & Parsons.